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05/31/10 01:48 PM #23    

 

Paul Frediani

Why the hec didn't you tell me! I was in Lucca last week and I could alway use a good meal!


06/03/10 02:07 AM #24    

 

Paul Frediani

Hey, anyone  coming in from out of town maybe interested in staying in this rental for the weekend. Nice place near the Marina, in SF.   http://www.vrbo.com/228547
 


06/15/10 05:46 PM #25    

Robert Castelli

Anyone know the whereabouts of Ron Richmond? 


06/15/10 05:48 PM #26    

Robert Castelli

Hey Bob,

Are your Snakes still in the family?


06/27/10 07:06 PM #27    

 

Paul Frediani

Hi Everyone

 

Our reunion was a wonderful gathering of friends. Unfortunately looking back I think that there were many people that I did not have the opportunity to make connection with, for that I'm sorry. I had a wonderful time and I (we) can't thank Jonni enough for her fantastic effort in pulling off the reunion and reception. Thank you Jonni for a night I will always remember, and I would also like to thank your husband Cliff for his tireless work. You know what they say "behind every wonderful women is a good man." I hope we all keep in touch, hey, the 50th is right around the corner.

 

Paul


06/27/10 09:33 PM #28    

 

Eric Swartz

To all:

I'd like to echo Paul's sentiments.

This event set the gold standard for reunions...and Joni has been our faithful standard bearer.

Joni--I can't thank you enough! 

Wow, reconnecting with old friends, sharing fond memories, rekindling relationships, and making new memories is what it's all about.

This weekend will always be remembered as a touchstone in my life. 

Please, let's keep the communication going. I don't want to wait another 10 years. We've got a fantastic social networking site...so let's use it and enjoy it.

See you all soon!

My best,

Eric

 

 

 

 

 

 


06/28/10 11:04 AM #29    

 

Frank Misko

 

Invition to a jokes list.  I send out jokes and pics about twice a month to 100 plus friends, a third of those from Mills. An average email may have 10 pics and 10 jokes collected since the last jokes sent. I keep it fairly clean. I welcome you to forward your jokes and pics to me clean or not. I send them BCC as bulk so you generally have to include me as a friend so it does not go to spam.
Do not reply from here. To be included send from the email you wish to receive the jokes to my email address that I use for this   Frankjokespics@gmail.com
Until next time.
Frank Misko
Thanks again Joni.

06/28/10 10:18 PM #30    

 

Jonette "Joni" Middleton (Brockway)

Thank you everyone for your kind words.  I had a great time planning the reunion weekend.  I have always enjoyed getting together with friends and I don't want to loose contact with any of you!

And a BIG thank you for the gifts.  Wow I didn't expect that.  Cliff and I are looking forward to our "Spa" getaway.  Since September Cliff has said he is a "Reunion Widower", so we are excited about spending some relaxing time together...away from computers.  And I promise to use the extra funds to extend the web site for many years.

I also want to say Thank You to Peggy Jones Aycinena.  If you missed reading the personalized labels she put on each wine bottle centerpiece...please see below.  It is incredible.

The front label said: Vin de Valhalla      Mills High Vikings       Mills Estate Bottled  Since 1966

The back label read:

Grown & nurtured on the green hills and verdant valleys of sunny Millbrae/Burlingame, where the breezes are light and the living is easy, Vintage 1970 Vin de Valhalla is a special class of wine, fermented in fine oak casks that offer a hint of revolution and social upheaval, a smidgen of suburban angst, a snooker-full of cliques, dances, and fashion concerns, and a glimpse into a time when gas was less that 40 cents a gallon; there was no Internet, or email; no Starbucks, Microsoft, Title IX, Watergate, AIDS, or 9/11; no ATM, PDA, PC, UPC, URL, MP3, DVD, HDTV, WiFi, GPS, Y2K, TXT, or LOL.  There was, however, a Soviet Union, an Earth Day, a slide rule, a typewriter, and film for cameras.  The world only had 3.6 billion people as Vintage 1970 headed out singularly unprepared for the next 40 years.  Seared now by four decades of change, innovation, and upheaval, Vintage 1970 Vin de Vallhalla is best enjoyed on warm tranquil days awash in vague memories of silly little worries that seemed like everything then, and seem more clearly like nothing now.

Visit http://www.mills1970.com for food pairing ideas.

Government warning: Revisionist history is an incarcerable offense.  However, consumption of alcoholic beverages is possibly a quick solution to many of life's little problems.

 

Please promise to stay in touch and remember to keep your profiles updated with your current e-mail address.

Thank You ALL!


06/29/10 03:41 PM #31    

Wilma Caputo (Motta)

Wilma Caputo Motta

It was fun  connecting with the Sunday lunch bunch and I hope to see you all at the 50!!!Joni thanks is just not enough to say for a beautiful weekend.....take care and enjoy your spa day...


07/02/10 12:04 PM #32    

 

Aifai Mausia (Vaka)

ALOHA everyone!

I too wanted to echo my thank you to you Joni and your husband Cliff for your hospitality.

I really enjoyed the 3 day events and can't wait for our next gathering.

It was great fun meeting so many friends and I must apologize that I seem to forget many of you but it took one reception evening to bring back memories. I am amazed at how many people remembered the little things that happened during our senior year. I returned home knowing that I truly have friends that I need to keep relationships going with. Thanks to Joni and Cindy Billen Severson for getting me excited about coming.

Cindy and I went to take a tour of Mills high on Sunday after the Hola restaraunt gathering. Mills looks the same and it was a good feeling waling around the school yard, the gym and to reminsce of our good ole days. Does any of you know what the class of 1970 project? Sorry I was not into the grad night event nor any of that project. I was still too new in the states that I did good to graduate and go on with my life.  But Mills will always be part of my life. Thank you.

Thank you Penny and Paul for letting me present the flower lei and the candy lei to Joni and Cliff. My knees were shaking but had to pull such a quick presentation off with my Toastmasters skills. Please let me know if any of our class is a Toastmasters member. We can share notes.  I belong to the FedMasters club in Kansas City, Missouri. It is my continuing education in writing and presenting speeches.

I hope we can hold another reunion in 5 years because 10 years seems so far away.

It is my proposal and I will be willing to help Joni with any of the preparaion.

Ok...by the way I wanted to share one excitement while at the hotel gathering. I met up with Mr Froomin and he congratulated me for speaking Engling well. Then our conversation took us to talk about where we live and came to find out that Mr. Froomin's hometown is Kansa City. MO. Wow...small world. Matter fact where I work...I can go to the 14th floor and see Prospect Ave where Mr. Froomin used to live.  Small world.

Ok..take care everyone and please keep connecting.

fun memories.

Aileen Aifai Vaka


07/09/10 08:02 AM #33    

 

Paul Frediani

Can we have a round of applause for our classmate Cheryl McGovern who is deploying to supervise BP contractors in Louisiana. Thank you Cheryl!

"Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country. "
 

John F. Kennedy


08/03/10 10:07 AM #34    

 

John Gilderbloom

I along with a few other Alums are going to the Outsidelands Festival coming up in San Francisco August 14-15:

http://www.sfoutsidelands.com

Check out the wonderful bands coming including Al Green, My Morning Jacket (from Louisville!),  Kingsl of Leon, and many other cutting edge bands.  Oh, and for good measure they through in Further which is the old Grateful Dead band.  Check out what  Spin had to say:

http://www.spin.com/gallery/10-must-hear-artists-outside-lands

I got about people coming so far from Mills. I went last year and it was great--lots of good food, wine, and fog!  I love fog after spending 22 hot and sizzling summers in Kentucky!  Ouch. 
Hope you can all come!

 

John "the Viking" Gilderbloom


07/05/11 09:27 AM #35    

Robert Beede

Has anybody located Laura Morgan yet?  I saw Meg Bishop's post the day she did it, and wrote immediately to her.  We had a great little Email chat, remembering the good ol days when love was simple, sweet, and pure.  Meg was SUCH a cutie!  I bet she still is!

Anyway, I would love to contact Laura as well, to see how she is doing. She was a very grounded and compassionate lady in High School!

I wish we were as insightful at 16 as we are now!

Best to all!

Bob Beede

 


06/06/14 08:06 AM #36    

 

John Gilderbloom

Hey I will be going to the Giants versus Nationals game at noon this coming Thursday on June 12, 2014.  If anyone wants to join me for some afternoon talk about the old days at Mills High School---I am especially interested in my Mills Viking chum whose  SF real estate investor  friend  is
Barry Bonds and has a suite at AT&T parik.  But I can't kiss and tell---but I ask every year and we just end up having pizza in North Beach.   Hey!   I am just asking for two and will pay whatever cost it is for you!   Howard?  After the game I head to Tahoe to stay at family home in Incline Village and then back to the city for the weekend.  Any thoughts of what a native must do on a weekend?    I will also be in Portland, Oregon doing research, going on bike reides and  giving a speech this coming Sunday through Wednesday.  Any Vikings out there?  Please email me at Jgilde02@sprynet.com or call me at 502-608-7567.  t

 

Thanks, John "the best Viking Mascot ever" Gilderbloom!

http://www.gilderbloom.org

http://sun.louisville.edu


06/08/14 07:00 AM #37    

 

Jonette "Joni" Middleton (Brockway)

As a local - how about Beach Blanket Babylon and a trip to Filoli. 


08/22/15 01:01 PM #38    

Lori Palmer (Leary)

We are so sad to hear of Dereck's passing. We shared some fun times back in the 70's and Tom and I have been reminiscing about our crazy times together. Anne and family, take care, and please know we are thinking of you all. Love, Lori (and Tom)


08/23/15 03:39 PM #39    

Robert Castelli

Derecks passing is a shock to anyone who knew him. He was full of life, and a great person to do things with while at Mills. We were able to reconnect at past reunions, and had some good laughs. Go in peace my friend, and may God bless you. You will be missed. Prayers to the Dragonetti family at this most difficult time. 


12/29/15 10:25 AM #40    

 

John Gilderbloom

Come to Cuba with me!  by John "the Viking" Gilderbloom

            As a planner some of our most celebrated work has been here in East Russell which has been recently hailed in the Journal of Community Development as a model for urban regeneration. We specialize in renewal without removal of residents or even better can take an abandoned boarded up “Village West” and with $30 million dollars repurpose it an attractive, affordable and sustainable mixed income development.   This anchor green development in East Russell has seen crime cut in half while home prices have the second highest increase in the city from 1990 to 2010.  

As our reputation grew on the art of rebuilding abandoned urban neighborhoods, I got invitations to work in other Kentucky cities like Newport and Covington, speak at top Universities,  featured in the Sunday New York Times, and wrote op-ed pieces in Wall Street Journal and Washington Post.  East Russell was cited by President Clinton as a model when he spoke to the U.S. Conference of Mayors.  At the same time, Clinton’s  top South African advisor (Donald Terner who worked with us as a consultant) told President Nelson Mandela that East Russell partnership was much better designed and humane than faceless Le Corbusier / Khrushchev projects that were being pushed by Russia.  Later Planitzen ranked me as one of the top urban thinkers in the world.

            Our reputation for regenerating neighborhoods continue to grow with an unprecedented invitation from the Cuban National Architecture Union to give a series of lectures behind the bamboo curtain.   I was one of the first non-Marxist American planners invited there. I got a hero’s welcome by Cubans, speaking in outdoor venues covered by Cuban TV and newspapers. The Cubans honored me with a special Diploma /Certificate in Architecture. The lectures went so well I was asked by both Cuban and American authorities to organize cultural exchanges that involved 31 programs totaling 480 days from 1997 to 2007. 

            Even the most jaded traveler would find Cuba, one of the most beautiful and fascinating places in the world. With 500 years of history and heritage, it is the site of one of the largest intact collections of Spanish Colonial architecture as well as the largest collections of Soviet era prefabricated buildings. UNESCO has declared Havana a world heritage site.  In this beautiful and intriguing setting, travelers experienced a radically different economic, social, and cultural life; like Soviet Union and China, the painful truth is that Socialism was unworkable within a competitive global economy.

Several travel magazines and books, including Holiday Travel, Travel Smart, and Budget Travel, have praised our Cuba travel programs.  “Time Out: Havana and the Best of Cuba” ranked it as the best “educational optioned and “the least bureaucratic way” for a U.S. passport holder to travel to Cuba.”

I saw things up close that few people new or understood.  I also could credibly argue that the U.S. travel and economic blockade was not only un-American but gave Cuba an excuse to blame its impoverishment on the U.S. instead of authoritarian undemocratic socialism.  I appeared on both U.S. and Cuban media outlets (popular and scholarly), CNN, and gave testimony before U.S. Senate, addressed former   Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, key Republican and Democratic Senators,  and spoke candidly in the ultra-secure  “situation room” of the U.S. State Department for ending the U.S. blockade.   

With travel restrictions still in place, University of Louisville Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods has a U.S. Treasury license to take Kentucky citizens, on a people-to-people exchange program March 12 to 20. For detailed information about how urbanists, planners, designers and architects can participate, please visit our website at http://sun.louisville.edu, with $200 deposits due by January 6, 2016.     This program is an exceptional value, with non-stop air from Miami to Havana, 4 star accommodations, transfers, daily breakfast, several dinners, travel Visa, entertainment, English-speaking  guides, and U.S. Treasury license. As Cuba slowly opens up to trade, this is a great opportunity for entrepreneurs to get a leg up on new business opportunities in health, agriculture, preservation, transportation and housing.

 


Inline Image Not Displayed
UofL Planning Professor, Dr. Gilderbloom visiting Hemingway’s “Old Man and the Sea” the late Gregorio “El Capitan” Fuentes.


02/12/16 08:56 AM #41    

 

Jonette "Joni" Middleton (Brockway)

Bottlerock Napa Valley Music Festival May 27 - 29, 2016

http://www.bottlerocknapavalley.com/

 

I understand that several of our classmates are planning on attending the Bottlerock Festival.

The link (above) will give you information on how to buy tickets.

I know that John Gilderbloom was working on setting up some get-togethers for our classmates. (If you are on Facebook check out John's January 14th posting on Facebook)

Please use this forum to help arrange meet ups with fellow classmates.


02/12/16 06:52 PM #42    

 

John Gilderbloom

Hey everybody.  I got the VIP tickets since it provides a separate area without people pressing up against you, better food, clean bathrooms, chairs and shade.  It will also be easier to meet up with Mills High Alumni in these areas.  I will come as a Viking!   My family has a ranck in the Russian River Area but its an hour drive so if anyone know about a good airbnb or Motel.  Let me know.  Hope to see you all there!  Thanks for the post.  Stevie Wonder was better than Paul or Bruce when he came to Louseyville. 


06/13/16 10:21 AM #43    

 

John Gilderbloom

Beautiful and Courageous Vikings!  Now you can go on a real big Viking Cruise filled with all of our favorite bands that played the Fillmore and Avalon!  I have seen several of them in the past year and they get it note perfect :see  Animals,  5th Dimension,  Family Stone,  Three Dog Night, Zombies, Monkees, Chad and Jeremy, Lovin Spoonful, Rare Earth,  Spencer Davis, Vanilla Fudge, Yardbirds, and many more. 

 

Come Join us for a rock and roll Caribbean cruise Feb 27 to March 4--

 

Yes, I am finally going to my first cruise leaving  March 27 from Ft. LAUDERdale, to Jamaica  and Bahamas and returning back March 4 to Ft. LAUDERdale.  They got this incredible line-up of groups  with some of the early members still kicking!

When we stop  in the cool tourist beaches of Jamica and Bahamas, we can go shopping, do walking tours and go snorkeling.     Call it an end of the world rock and roll party of friends and lovers especially if Trump has his fingers on the nuclear warheads So let’s go out with a bang! We did this in Cleveland and it was a blast seeing Bruce Springsteen, John Fogerty, R.E.M.   and others.    Anyway,  its an amazing price of just $1,200 to share a room without a window and with a window about $1,700.  Also, if you give this code number AROTR you can get $200 off per cabin.  Here is the website:

 

http://flowerpowercruise.com

 

Please forward this to others who love to rock and roll in the sunshine while our families are freezing. 

 

Warmest Regards,

 

John Gilderbloom

1405 Morton Ave

Louisville, KY 40204

502-608-7567


09/18/17 08:31 AM #44    

 

John Gilderbloom

Congratulations to Professor John I. “Hans” Gilderbloom who was nominated as one of the world’s most influential urbanists. Dr. Gillderbloom is only one nominated out of Kentucky:

https://www.planetizen.com/node/94570/vote-most-influential-urbanists

We hope you will give him a vote along with the many other outstanding candidates on the list!

 His fingerprints are all over hundreds of cities around the world for his work in sustainability, health, and transportation.  His books and articles are used widely in classes around the world.  He has been credited as a major player in getting passed and defending the enactment of tenant protections against unfair evictions and unreasonable rents in over 125 cities including Los Angeles, San Francisco, and over 100 New Jersey cities.  These laws cover millions of tenants.  His research on the housing and transportation needs of the disabled and elderly was provided a justification for Congress  passing  Americans Disability Act according to Planning Magazine.  Dr. Gilderbloom has also showed how to partner up with non-profits, government, developers and banks in creating and renovating  attractive, affordable, and sustainable homes in cities.  He has also linked this success  to traffic calming by converting fast multi-lane one way streets into calmer two-way for greater walkability, biking and transit use. Dr. Gilderbloom also argues the need to empower poor citizens to demand and act to create livable neighborhoods by cleaning up graffiti, liter, and painting homes to encourage neighborhood regeneration. Dr. Gilderbloom  was also an effective advocate for ending the U.S. Embargo of  Cuba testifying in the US Senate and writing about the harsh situation. Finally, Dr. Gilderbloom research has encouraged cities to take a more active role in reducing air, water and ground pollution that will improve life span, prosperity, housing, and health.   

Links:

Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods
http://sun.louisville.edu 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvacxkfyNSQ&t=32s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYNsUdRrxlU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ra3U8h4MSY
 

 

 


09/19/17 04:04 PM #45    

Yvette Arrighi (Royce)

WOW!!  Way to make a positive difference in our world.  yes

You rock, John!

(And, whoever shared this, thank you.)


06/08/18 01:17 PM #46    

 

John Gilderbloom

Hey anybody have some good contacts, organizations, bookstores, community groups, preservation organizations, that might want me to give a talk while I am on the West Coast starting in LA and SB (August 2 & 3), SF August 4&5, SR August 6; Portland August 7-9; Seattle August 10!  I am talking about my latest book: Chromatic Homes: The Joy of Color in Historic Places. We are thinking of doing a party at the Cable Car Museum August 5 at noon and then going to the Chowder House at Fisherman's Wharf.  Please go this website that gives lots more information and shows some of the cool colorful and chromatic houses that are part of this exciting and pleasant book!

http://www.chromatichomes.com

 

Chromatic Homes:  The Joy of Color in Historic Places by John Gilderbloom

 

Lexington, KY—Walking through a historic neighborhood can be relaxing and offer a feast for the eyes—tree lined streets of white clapboard Queen Ann cottages, the earth-toned stucco of Italianate villas, the brick and dark wood of Arts and Crafts bungalows, perhaps the gray stone façade of a Romanesque-revival church. Then around the corner looms an imposing gothic revival home with bright teal-colored vertical board-and-batten, trimmed in school-bus yellow, leading up to salmon-colored ginger breading accenting the steeply pitched roof. Such a site is impossible to ignore and begs the question, “Who would do this, and why?”

When he began his research for Chromatic Homes: The Joy of Color in Historic Places, John I. “Hans” Gilderbloom was studying “painted ladies”—Victorian houses with three or more colors that embellish architectural details, most notably found in San Francisco. During the course of his work, however, he noticed a broader trend of colorful homes that were not necessarily Victorian or multi-colored, but had a similar impact, both visually and within their neighborhoods. To talk about this trend, he coined the term “chromatic homes” to encompass the bright, joyfully decorated houses that are widespread and diverse, ranging from New Orleans to Amsterdam in the Netherlands. Gilderbloom documents not only where these homes can be found, but also the impact they have on their neighborhoods and cities.

Gilderbloom’s study of chromatic homes started in San Francisco with the painted ladies that have become a hallmark of the city’s appeal, but it did not stop there. He focuses the bulk of his attention on what he terms the five sister cities of chromatic homes. Aside from San Francisco, there is Louisville, also home to numerous painted ladies; Miami and its art deco homes from the 20s and 30s; New Orleans’ colorful shotgun homes; and Cincinnati, where color was used to revitalize a largely abandoned neighborhood. The same spirit of revitalization is found across the Ohio River in Covington, Kentucky, where 100-year-old buildings were renewed with color. He also outlines an older, international tradition of colorful buildings such as St. Basil’s Cathedral in Russia as well as homes in Cuba; Burano, Italy; and Arles, France.

Chromatic homes brighten a neighborhood, but can also have non-aesthetic effects on their communities. The conventional wisdom is that colorful homes do not sell, but as Gilderbloom shows, vibrant paint can actually generate higher property values for the owner and the neighborhood. They can revitalize communities that have started to fall into disrepair and bring new life to neighborhoods that are being deserted. For instance, Louisville turned around a dying neighborhood by painting the old Victorian homes bright, inviting colors. The positive effects of chromatic homes are not just limited to property values. This type of individual expression has been shown to make people happier and healthier, and even just one house becoming a chromatic home can spark a change for the better throughout a neighborhood.

Gilderbloom goes beyond the tightly focused concept of the “painted ladies” to open up a new area of observation and study. There is still much for experts to explore and learn about chromatic homes and the impact they can have on communities and residents. Chromatic homes not only provide opportunities for researchers to learn, but also for homeowners who wish to bring new life to their homes. Gilderbloom has shown that chromatic homes are joyful representations of self and community that can rejuvenate neighborhoods struggling with abandonment and bring new, creative energy to their area. The value that chromatic homes bring and the possibilities they present are well worth the cost of the paint.

John I. “Hans” Gilderbloom is a professor in the Graduate Planning, Public Administration, Public Health, and Urban Affairs programs at the University of Louisville, where he also directs the Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods. Considered one of the foremost urban thinkers of our time, he is the author of five books, fifty-five scholarly articles, and op-eds in Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times along with features of his work in the New York Times and Planning.

 

 


07/27/18 09:26 PM #47    

 

John Gilderbloom

Dr. John I. “Hans” Gilderbloom be giving a book talk and slide presentation of his highly acclaimed book, Chromatic Homes:  The Joy of Color in Historic Places ( Http://www.chromatichomes.com ),  at the Burlingame Public Library (480 Primrose Road) on August 5 at 3:00 p.m. Dr. Gilderbloom who grew up in Burlingame is now  considered one of the nation’s top urban thinkers in a international poll by Planetizen. 

Walking through a historic neighborhood can be relaxing and offer a feast for the eyes—tree lined streets of white clapboard Queen Ann cottages, the earth-toned stucco of Italianate villas, the brick and dark wood of Arts and Crafts bungalows, perhaps the gray stone façade of a Romanesque-revival church. Then around the corner looms an imposing gothic revival home with bright teal-colored vertical board-and-batten, trimmed in school-bus yellow, leading up to salmon-colored ginger breading accenting the steeply pitched roof. Such a site is impossible to ignore and begs the question, “Who would do this, and why?”

When he began his research for Chromatic Homes: The Joy of Color in Historic Places, John I. “Hans” Gilderbloom was studying “painted ladies”—Victorian houses with three or more colors that embellish architectural details, most notably found in San Francisco. During the course of his work, however, he noticed a broader trend of colorful homes that were not necessarily Victorian or multi-colored, but had a similar impact, both visually and within their neighborhoods. To talk about this trend, he coined the term “chromatic homes” to encompass the bright, joyfully decorated houses that are widespread and diverse, ranging from New Orleans to Amsterdam in the Netherlands. Gilderbloom documents not only where these homes can be found, but also the impact they have on their neighborhoods and cities.

Gilderbloom’s study of chromatic homes started in San Francisco with the painted ladies that have become a hallmark of the city’s appeal, but it did not stop there. He focuses the bulk of his attention on what he terms the five sister cities of chromatic homes. Aside from San Francisco, there is Louisville, also home to numerous painted ladies; Miami and its art deco homes from the 20s and 30s; New Orleans’ colorful shotgun homes; and Cincinnati, where color was used to revitalize a largely abandoned neighborhood. The same spirit of revitalization is found across the Ohio River in Covington, Kentucky, where 100-year-old buildings were renewed with color. He also outlines an older, international tradition of colorful buildings such as St. Basil’s Cathedral in Russia as well as homes in Cuba; Burano, Italy; and Arles, France.

Chromatic homes brighten a neighborhood, but can also have non-aesthetic effects on their communities. The conventional wisdom is that colorful homes do not sell, but as Gilderbloom shows, vibrant paint can actually generate higher property values for the owner and the neighborhood. They can revitalize communities that have started to fall into disrepair and bring new life to neighborhoods that are being deserted. For instance, Louisville turned around a dying neighborhood by painting the old Victorian homes bright, inviting colors. The positive effects of chromatic homes are not just limited to property values. This type of individual expression has been shown to make people happier and healthier, and even just one house becoming a chromatic home can spark a change for the better throughout a neighborhood.

Gilderbloom goes beyond the tightly focused concept of the “painted ladies” to open up a new area of observation and study. There is still much for experts to explore and learn about chromatic homes and the impact they can have on communities and residents. Chromatic homes not only provide opportunities for researchers to learn, but also for homeowners who wish to bring new life to their homes. Gilderbloom has shown that chromatic homes are joyful representations of self and community that can rejuvenate neighborhoods struggling with abandonment and bring new, creative energy to their area. The value that chromatic homes bring and the possibilities they present are well worth the cost of the paint.

 

 He notes with pride that his Grandfather Herbert Lauder left San Francisco right after the earthquake of 1906 and started a remarkable career in building houses and apartments in Burlingame.   Herbert Lauder, an immigrant from Scotland,  was known for building more houses and apartments in Burlingame in the 1940’s with one newspaper calling him the richest man on the San Francisco Peninsula.  He was a “mover and shaker” in Burlingame pushing for trees everywhere and fought hard to have the gigantic Eucalyptus trees along El Camino Real and insisting no commercial developments be built along El Camino—save Burlingame and Broadway Avenue. Herbert Lauder called for beautiful human scale design and  once said:  “when you build it, make it beautiful otherwise it won’t last..” Nearly eighty years later, his houses and apartments are still there honoring the architectural heritage of Spain, Mexico and England.   Jeanette Gilderbloom along with her three brothers and sister (Margaret) inherited and managed his beautiful apartment building in downtown Burlingame. Today planners rank Burlingame as one of the best examples of sustainable development and “new urbanist” city.   It should also be noted that Dr. Gilderbloom’s,  Aunt Margaret’s husband  and his brother  were also involved in saving the Cable Cars from extinction by  painting them bright colors and Uncle Art was known as the Maestro of the colorful cable cars.  This program is a celebration of what makes Burlingame one of the greatest towns to live in. I have attached some pictures for local newspapers, social media and historic preservation groups.  Here is the PR on the book. Other book presentations are being given in LA, Santa Barbara, Portland, San Francisco, and Seattle. Please spread the word!

 

Bright, vibrant, intriguing, and unique, chromatic homes are speckled across the world’s landscape. These historic houses and buildings are saturated with colors – often highlighting decorative woodwork and architecture—to enhance, revive, and regenerate various neighborhoods and communities. John I. “Hans” Gilderbloom explores and celebrates the appeal of these captivating houses in Chromatic Homes: The Joy of Color in Historic Places. 

 

Highlighted in gorgeous detail are the relevance of the homes’ styles and colors as well as their history—many believed to have been around for decades in American cities such as Louisville, Cincinnati, San Francisco, New Orleans, and Miami, and around for centuries in far-flung places such as Havana, Cuba, Venice, Italy, and Moscow, Russia. Gilderbloom reveals how renewing and updating historic homes has the ability to transform and galvanize a community, and these houses serve as creative havens for artists, writers, and musicians: author Alice Walker wrote The Color Purple in one of the most famous chromatic homes in San Francisco, and Mark Twain wrote The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer in a spectacular “painted lady” in Hartford, Connecticut. 

 

Filled with 182 engaging and eye-catching photos of homes all across the nation and the world, Chromatic Homes perfectly illustrates how the simple act of painting an ornate structure in bright or bold colors can inspire, empower, sustain and enlighten an entire community. Chromatic Homes creates prosperity, pride, and joy for the homeowner and neighborhood. “Great neighborhoods are the secret sauce of great cities and communities of all kinds, sizes, and stripes, but great neighborhoods don’t happen by accident. They are continuously rebuilt, revitalized, and actively redesigned. They can, and should, be inclusive places where regeneration benefits everyone. Gilderbloom argues that the principles of chromatic design can help us create better neighborhoods and communities. 

 

 

"This book is an important contribution to the future of cities.”—Richard Florida, author of The Rise of the Creative Class 

 

 

“Painting houses is a worldwide practice for self-expression. It also cues in that someone of responsibility and concern is around. Color, and its maintenance, can thus be an urban force for confidence. Chromatic Homes takes such concerns seriously and helps us see what, when taken to exuberant forms, can be the delightful result.”—Harvey Molotch, author of The City as a Growth Machine.

 

 

“Brilliant, beautiful and brash.”— Larry Muhammad, playwright, journalist and book author 

 

 

John I. “Hans” Gilderbloom is a professor in the Graduate Planning, Public Administration, Public Health, and Urban Affairs programs at the University of Louisville, where he also directs the highly lauded Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods. Considered one of the foremost urban thinkers of our time by a international survey conducted by Planetizen, he is the author of six books, 55 scholarly articles and op-eds in Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. He wrote this book in his own chromatic home in Louisville, Kentucky which was previously featured along with a separate profile in the New York Times.  He  was raised in Burlingame and grew up in the house that my Grandfather built.  My Grandfather Herbert Lauder came to Burlingame after he witnessed on Market Street the great San Francisco  Earthquake of 1906.   He led the effort to have  Eucalyptus Trees planted along El Camino Real and banning commercial enterprises along the route in Burlingame, argued for train stations to be located at Burlingame Ave and Broadway,  built hundreds of rental houses and apartments for working people with style, beauty, sustainability, and walkability. 

 

John I. Gilderbloom Ph.D.

University of Louisville Presidential Medal for Distinguished Faculty Research and Creative Activity

http://www.chromatichomes.com

Top 100 Urban Thinker Planetizen International Survey

Professor of Planning, Public Administration, Urban Affairs and Public Health

Home of the Top Ranked (#14) Planning Program in North America by Citation Index

 Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods


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